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The Recovery Act At Work
Luzerne County
$129,082,845 *
With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds, Pennsylvania is building lasting assets. Recovery Act awards are helping to pave roads and fix bridges, fund clean water projects, strengthen a public education system that continues to produce academic gains for students, and improve our state's environment and energy efficiency. The Recovery Act is also helping those most in need through extended unemployment benefits, food assistance and health care. In the process, Pennsylvania is creating tens of thousands of jobs. For more detailed information about projects in your county, follow the corresponding project link below. In instances where projects impact more than one county, the project and funding amount may appear in other county summaries. Many other projects in the county are funded by Recovery Act dollars distributed directly from federal agencies. Information on those projects is available at http://www.recovery.gov/.
Education
Energy
Energy $10,088,900 *
The project will increase energy efficiency in homes by reducing energy costs and increasing comfort while safeguarding the health and safety of the resident. Eligible applicants are those persons or families whose income is at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. On-site energy audits are conducted on each home to determine which of the following measures would be installed or services performed, up to an average of $6,500 per home: blower door guided air sealing to effectively locate and reduce air-leakage throughout the home; installation of attic, wall, basement and crawlspace insulation and ventilation to reduce energy loss; heating system modification or replacement to increase the efficiency and/or safety of the heating system; minor repairs, and/or health and safety measures are provided (when necessary) to allow the safe and effective installation of the weatherization measures; energy baseload reduction, including CFL and appliance replacement, and; client education on the proper use and maintenance of the installed Weatherization measures and ways to reduce energy waste everyday. The project will weatherize 1,151 homes through 3/31/12.
Retrofitting of Outdoor Arena Marquee to LED Displays An experienced sign company will be contracted to provide the labor, materials and equipment to remove the existing double face, solid matrix lamp banks and fabricate and install two single face, full color LED displays. Contracted company will provide and/or install new power supplies, control systems and personnel training. Estimated Energy Savings = 90% marquee eneergy savings
The West Wyoming Borough Town Hall was built in 1911, the building is antiquated and energy inefficient. An architect and electrical engineer from Pasonick Engeneering Inc have performed a through energy assessment of the town hall and have determined that there are a number of energy efficiency opportunities available for the building to improve energy efficiency and reduce costs for the municpality. Through funds from this grant the building will have an energy efficiency retrofit, including a high efficiency Energy Star furnace and air conditioning, energy efficient windows, insulation, brick re-pointing and energy efficient lighting. This project will increase energy efficiency, provide 27.5 percent reduction in energy consumption and a reduction in energy costs for the borough of greater than $1000.
Gildea Hall will replace 162 T12 fixtures with equivalent T8 fixtures and 42 incandescent exit signs with equivalent LED fixtures. This will result in the savings of $3,823 and defer the production of 38,230 kWhrs of electricity annually. The total cost for installation is $24,323. Mercy Hall Replace 48 windows increasing the R value from 1.15 to 4. This will result in the savings of $6,144.59 and defer the use of 3,914 CCF of natural gas annually. The cost for the installation is $363,225 with the University's match of $250,000 offsetting more than two_thirds of the project cost. Estimated Energy Savings = Lighting 26.7%; Heating 29%
Huntington Township's municipal facility has insulation levels with an R value of 2, T12 fixtures are used throughout the facility, inefficient electric hot water and inefficient electric baseboard heating. The goal of this project is to tighten the building from an insulation perspective and reduce overall energy usage in lighting, general heating and water heating. Overall energy savings would total 71% on insulation, 64% on lighting, 13% on hot water heating and 56 % on general heating. This results in a whole building energy savings of 57%. The total construction cost for the project is $25,503 with engineering costs of $6,500. These savings will allow the Township to maintain its staff of 3.5 full time employees and temporarily employ 11 for the construction of the facilities recommended. Estimated Energy Savings equals 71% on insulation, 64% on lighting, 13% on hot water heating and 56 % on general heating. Whole building energy savings of 57%.
This project includes removal of old high wattage light fixtures in seven (7) airport buildings, purchase of new lower wattage high efficiency fluorescent fixtures and bulbs (of similar or greater lumens compared to the old fixtures), the installation of the new fluorescent fixtures, and the advertising of bids to obtain the materials and installation contractor. Estimated Energy Savings = Savings per building ranges from 28% to 81%
This project is for a multi_municipal cooperative effort to increase the energy efficiency of government buildings. The work will include lighting retrofitting, replacing windows, doors and garage doors, insulation, water heater, cooling coils and other energy efficient items. The three municipalities participating in this project will achieve energy savings. According to their engineering studies, they should realize annual energy savings of 49,031 kWh per year and .4119 MMcf per year, which should translate into an annual savings of $13,079. This project will help the muncipalities address the impacts of deregulation as well as contribute to the improvement of our environment. The NEPA Alliance will adminster this grant on behalf of the Back Mountain Community Partnership (BMCP) Estimated annual energy savings equals Dallas Lighting 61%; Heating 29%; Kingston Twp _ Lighting 50%; Heating 28%; Lehman savings increase of 30%.
This program will assist municipalities in realizing significant energy and cost savings by converting and/or retrofitting existing traffic signal lights, which utilize incandescent lamps to LED bulbs which have an extended life and are more energy efficient. LEDs are brighter, safer, and use significantly less energy 70-90% than traditional bulbs, typically resulting in much lower utility costs. Note: Utility costs savings are dependant on base rates and tariffs and the actual utility cost savings will be analyzed prior to the conversion project. Information provided by PennDOT District offices indicates that there are a total of 1,124 traffic signals within the seven county NEPA Alliance region. NEPA Alliance has estimated that 45% of the traffic signals in our region need to be converted to LED's. Forty-three municipalities have enrolled in the program, which will save 9,900 kWh per year and assist in retaining 8 permanent full time positions.
This program will assist municipalities in realizing significant energy and cost savings by converting and/or retrofitting existing traffic signal lights, which utilize incandescent lamps to LED bulbs which have an extended life and are more energy efficient. LEDs are brighter, safer, and use significantly less energy 70-90% than traditional bulbs, typically resulting in much lower utility costs. Note: Utility costs savings are dependant on base rates and tariffs and the actual utility cost savings will be analyzed prior to the conversion project.Information provided by PennDOT District offices indicates that there are a total of 1,124 traffic signals within the seven county NEPA Alliance region. NEPA Alliance has estimated that 45% of the traffic signals in our region need to be converted to LED's. Forty-three municipalities have enrolled in the program, which will save 9,900 kWh per year and assist in retaining 8 permanent full time positions.
The goal of the project is to install an energy efficient HVAC system retrofit in the City Building in order to create energy savings and increase efficiency over the 30 year expected life of the replacement unit. Lighting ballasts and fixtures will be replaced with energy efficiant models to save 35% on energy usage and expense. Additionally the City will change the existing pneumatic control system to electric/electronic and replace existing electric wall heaters with new, electric, fan powered wall heaters of equal heating capacity but over 30% greater efficiency. (revised)
The purpose of this project is to improve the energy efficiency of Hazleton City Hall through the installation of new windows and lighting fixtures and installing zoning controls for the heating system.
Environment
Environment $526,730 *
Federally Regulated Leaking Underground Storage Tank Site Corrective Action under ARRA grant
Federally Regulated Leaking Underground Storage Tank Site Corrective Action under ARRA grant
Federally Regulated Leaking Underground Storage Tank Site Corrective Action under ARRA grant
Federally Regulated Leaking Underground Storage Tank Site Corrective Action under ARRA grant
Federally Regulated Leaking Underground Storage Tank Site Corrective Action under ARRA grant
Federally Regulated Leaking Underground Storage Tank Site Corrective Action under ARRA grant
Other Infrastructure / Housing
Other Infrastructure / Housing $15,994,967 *
The project provides financial assistance and services to prevent individuals and families from becoming homeless or help those who are experiencing homelessness to be quickly re-housed and stabilized. Funds will be used for activities to address the jurisdiction’s homelessness needs such as: financial assistance with rental payments; security deposits; utility payments or deposits; arrearages; moving costs; and, motel/hotel vouchers; and housing relocation and stabilization services such as case management; outreach and engagement; housing search and placement; legal services; and, credit repair.
The project will construct a centre pavilion and vendor stall on the Tomato Festival site. The expanded use of the site for farmers’ markets and community events will support the revitalization of the Central Business District and the City of Pittston Includes demolition of 6 blighted structures.
The project consists of reconstruction of West Noble Street from Fairchild Street to street terminus.
The projects includes replacement of water main, pump station upgrade, tank replacement, and rebuilding of 3 filters.The median household income is below that of the statewide median.
The project will replace the existing combined sewers with 10,000 linear feet of storm sewers and 11,500 linear feet of sanitary sewers.The median household income of the service area is lower than the statewide median household income.
Construction of 3,000 feet of  60" diameter culvert, 6,700 feet of collection storm sewers, and 16,000 linear feet of sanitary sewage mains.The median household income of the service area is less than the statewide median household income.
Derringer/Fern Glen Water Main replacement of approximately 8,000 linear feet of water mains, replace existing storage tank with a larger 88,000 gallon tank, chemical feed building, hand held meter reading devices and purchase advanced digital leak detection system.The system serves 13 municipalities in the Greater Hazleton area. The median income of is about 75% of the state average. User rates are not expected to increase.
A total of approximately 1,500 feet of 8 inch and 10 inch sanitary sewer piping will be installed to convey sanitary sewage only. The weighted median household income is slightly less then the state average.  Rates are expected to increase by 12%.
The planting of 1,000 trees in urban (MS4) municipalities along streets and parking lots (Abington Township, Clarks Green Borough, Clarks Summit Borough, Jermyn Borough, Mayfield Borough, Scranton City, Exeter Borough, Forty Fort Borough, Kingston Borough, West Pittston Borough, West Wyoming Borough, Wilkes-Barre City, Factoryville Borough).    All the areas are MS4 municipalities--separate storm sewer systems within urbanized areas in the northeast. All have active shade tree commissions with a proven record of tree planting and maintenance activities with the PA U&CF Council.
Improve 350 feet of Wesley Road and, 7,395 feet of Bear Hollow Road, and replace 17 centimeter cross pipes with new 15" inch pipes.
The project shall consist of the construction and installation of a new combined sewer overflow, regulating Chamber System, and a new 24 inch Interceptor line with manholes. The weighted median household income of the system is slightly less than the state average.  Rates are expected to increase by 12%.
Public Safety
Transportation Infrastructure
Transportation Infrastructure $38,423,377 *
Replacement of Cleveland Street Bridge over Mill Creek in Plains Township
$20,232,056
Preservation of State Route 29 Bridge over Susquehanna River and State Route 29 Bridge over State Route 2002 (Sans Souci Highway) in Hanover Township
Bridge Rehabilitation of State Route 4001 bridge over Branch of Hunlock Creek and State Route 4016 bridge over Marsh Creek in Plymouth, Huntington and Ross Townships
$5,369,594
Resurfacing on various State Routes in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties
$2,865,138
Interstate 81 Resurfacing from Milepost 139-144 in Luzerne County
$7,543,361
Resurfacing of Interstate 81 Northbound and Southbound in Luzerne County
Workforce
Workforce $1,151,078 *
The project will assist families with re-negotiated mortgage plans through involvement in financial literacy/budgeting programs. It will start an in-home services program for medially frail adults (not eligible for Aging services, based on age), to reduce hospitalization/institutionalization of these individuals, to include semi-skilled care, home maintenance and nutritionally balanced meals. The agency will work with six local elementary schools, dealing with such issues as language barriers, acculturation and nutrition. A scholarship program for academically talented, low income high school seniors will assist with higher education costs. It will also include participation in the modernization of the Regional Food Bank, which serves as a clearing house storage facility for more than eighty food pantries, shelters and other feeding programs in the county.
* Totals reflect only funding flowing through state agencies.

Direct Benefits to Families
How PA Benefits People Helped in Luzerne County Explanation of Benefits Reporting as of
Food Assistance 46,195 The Recovery Act will help low income individuals and families with a 13.69% increase in the maximum Food Stamp (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program or SNAP) benefit. It also suspends the 3 month limit on assistance for many unemployed childless adults. March 2010
Health Insurance 59,482 Low income children and adults will continue to have access to health care through Medical Assistance. March 2010
Health Insurance for Unemployed 16,000 The Recovery Act will help make health care available to individuals who are involuntarily separated from their jobs. A COBRA subsidy will pay 65 percent of the monthly premium for individuals earning less than $145,000 and couples earning less than $290,000. March 2010
Taxpayer Relief 141,436 Individuals earning up to $75,000 will receive a $400 tax credit in 2009 and 2010. Married couples filing jointly and earning up to $150,000 will receive a $800 tax credit. October 2009
Unemployment Compensation 19,700 The Recovery Act will help these Pennsylvanians with a $25 per week increase in unemployment benefits through the rest of the year. It also provides additional weeks of benefits. March 2010
All numbers are estimates, and will fluctuate over time.
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Oversight Commission
The Stimulus Oversight Commission reviews, monitors and advises PA’s plans for stimulus spending to assure that citizens get the best from the program. Learn more.
Hotline
Concerned about suspected illegal or irresponsible actions regarding Recovery spending?  Call 877-888-7927. Learn more.
Do you want to view Recovery project contracts?
Contracts awarded for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds by state agencies are posted online through the Pennsylvania Treasury’s office. Search for ARRA contracts.